Practice Information

Practice guidelines provide licensees with general guidance to promote good practice and prevent instances of professional misconduct.1 They also benefit licensees and consumers by broadening their understanding of the law, rules and can regulations that define professional practice, including professional misconduct and unprofessional conduct. 1 Practice guidelines are not intended to establish a standard for the evaluation of issues in civil liability lawsuits involving claims of negligence or malpractice. The intent is to provide a frame of reference to be used with other appropriate considerations for assessment of issues relating to professional misconduct and unprofessional conduct as defined by law, rules, or regulations.

Practice guidelines do not have the force of law. While the guidelines may be a resource in understanding good professional conduct in relation to the professional discipline process, they may not be used as the basis for a charge of or a defense against a charge of professional misconduct. A licensee can only be charged with professional misconduct if there is a violation of the Education Law or Regents Rules. Determinations of which complaints lead to professional misconduct charges are made on a case¬ by¬ case basis in accordance with Section 6510 of the Education Law.

1Practice guidelines are not intended to establish a standard for the evaluation of issues in civil liability lawsuits involving claims of negligence or malpractice. The intent is to provide a frame of reference to be used with other appropriate considerations for assessment of issues relating to professional misconduct and unprofessional conduct as defined by law, rules or regulations.

Antibody Therapy (Intravenous or Subcutaneous Infusions)


An RN may administer antibody therapy (i.e., immunoglobulin therapy or monoclonal antibodies) pursuant to a valid patient specific order, under the following conditions:

  • The order defines the type, dose, route (intravenous or subcutaneous) and rate of administration of the antibody therapy, as well as monitoring requirements and premedication, if indicated.
  • A physician or other qualified practitioner must be immediately available to respond to an adverse reaction during the administration of the antibody therapy.
  • An emergency code cart and other emergency equipment and supplies must be immediately available during the infusion of the antibody therapy.
  • Health facility protocols permit the RN to administer ordered antibody therapy, monitor the patient and handle complications.
  • The RN has completed appropriate training covering the care of patients receiving antibody therapy and successfully demonstrates clinical competence in providing intravenous antibody therapy care at least annually.
  • Informed consent has been obtained, pursuant to health facility policy.

LPNs may NOT administer antibody therapy (monoclonal antibodies or immunoglobulins) intravenously, by subcutaneous infusion or subcutaneous intermittent infusion as this requires ongoing nursing assessment while the patient receives the infusion. An LPN may administer a single subcutaneous injection of antibodies, pursuant to an order, provided that an RN or other qualified practitioner is immediately available to perform any required assessment or respond to an adverse reaction.

Last Updated: February 11, 2021