Questions and Answers on Dental Anesthesia/Sedation Certification for New York State Licensed Dentists


New York State licensed dentists who use general anesthesia, deep sedation, or conscious (moderate) sedation (parenteral or enteral route with or without inhalation agents) must meet specific requirements and be certified by the New York State Education Department. The relevant section of Education Law Article 133, Section 6605-a of Title VIII; the relevant section of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education is Part 61.10.

Nothing in the law or regulations limit a dentist's use of local anesthesia, a dentist's use of nitrous oxide, or a dentist's use of any other substance or agent for a purpose other than achieving deep sedation, conscious (moderate) sedation, or general anesthesia.

What follows is basic information about the requirements. It is not a substitute for reading the provisions of the law or regulation. If you have additional questions, you may call the State Board for Dentistry at 518-474-3817 ext. 550, fax 518-473-0567 or e-mail dentbd@nysed.gov.

General Information | Contacts for Further Information

General Information

  1. What is “acceptable accrediting body”?

    Acceptable accrediting body means an accrediting body which is accepted by the department as a reliable authority for the purpose of accrediting educational programs in anesthesia, applying its criteria for granting accreditation in a fair, consistent, and nondiscriminatory manner, and which accredits such programs on a national basis.

  2. What is “general anesthesia?”

    General anesthesia means a drug-induced loss of consciousness during which patients are not arousable, even by painful stimulation. The ability to independently maintain ventilatory function is often impaired. Patients often require assistance in maintaining a patent airway, and positive pressure ventilation may be required because of depressed spontaneous ventilation or drug-induced depression of neuromuscular function. Cardiovascular function may be impaired.

  3. What is “deep sedation?”

    Deep sedation means a drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients cannot be easily aroused but respond purposefully following repeated or painful stimulation. The ability to independently maintain ventilatory function may be impaired. Patients may require assistance in maintaining a patent airway, and spontaneous ventilation may be inadequate. Cardiovascular function is usually maintained.

  4. What is “conscious (moderate) sedation?”

    Conscious (moderate) sedation means a drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients respond purposefully to verbal commands, either alone or accompanied by light tactile stimulation. Reflex withdrawal from a painful stimulus is not considered a purposeful response. No interventions are required to maintain a patent airway, and spontaneous ventilation is adequate. Cardiovascular function is usually maintained.

  5. What is “parentral?”

    Parenteral means a technique of administration in which the drug bypasses the gastrointestinal tract, including but not limited to intramuscular, intravenous, intranasal, submucosal, subcutaneous, and intraocular administration.

  6. What is “enteral?”

    Enteral means a technique of administration in which the agent is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract or oral mucosa, including but not limited to oral, rectal, and sublingual administration.

  7. What is “inhalation?”

    Inhalation means a technique of administration in which a gaseous or volatile agent is introduced into the pulmonary tree and whose primary effect is due to the absorption through the pulmonary bed.

  8. What does “continual” mean?

    Continual or continually means repeated regularly and frequently in a steady succession.

  9. What does “continuous” mean?

    Continuous or continuously means prolonged without any interruption in time.

  10. What does “patent” mean?

    Patent means open, unobstructed, or not closed.

  11. What is a “time-oriented” anesthesia record?

    Time-oriented anesthesia record means an organized document which shows at appropriate time intervals, drugs and doses administered, and physiologic data obtained through patient monitoring, during the course of conscious (moderate) sedation, deep sedation, or general anesthesia, to include the preoperative, intraoperative and recovery stages of treatment.

  12. What are ASA’s patient physical status classifications?

    American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Patient Physical Status Classification

    • ASA I – A normal healthy patient
    • ASA II – A patient with mild systemic disease
    • ASA III – A patient with severe systemic disease
    • ASA IV – A patient with severe systemic disease that is a constant threat to life
    • ASA V – A moribund patient who is not expected to survive without the operation
    • ASA VI- A declared brain-dead patient whose organs are being removed for donor purposes
    • E – Emergency operation of any variety (used to modify one of the above classifications, i.e., ASA III-E)

Contacts for Further Information

  1. What if I have questions or need further information?

    You should contact the Office of the State Board for Dentistry, New York State Education Department, Office of the Professions, State Education Building - 2nd Floor, 89 Washington Avenue, Albany, New York 12234, telephone 518-474-3817, ext. 550, fax 518-473-0567, e-mail dentbd@nysed.gov.

    Please visit this Web site periodically for current information related to the practice of your profession.

Last Updated: May 9, 2018